A Guide to Affordable Housing

A Guide to Affordable Housing

Affordable housing is social rented, affordable rented and intermediate housing, provided to eligible households whose needs are not met by the housing market.


Affordability is a huge issue for many households in our district, especially as house prices continue to rise in South Cambridgeshire. 

With house prices out of reach for many on an average income and private rentals at the lower end of the market are few and far between, finding an affordable home can be extremely difficult.

For those that can’t afford to buy on the open market or private rent, the only option for many is to seek affordable housing.

Eligibility for affordable housing is determined with regard to local incomes and local house prices.

We've produced an affordable housing guide to help explain what affordable housing is, the different tenure models available, who it is aimed at and how it is allocated.

The Government defines affordable housing as social rented, affordable rented and intermediate housing. These are provided to eligible households whose needs are not met by the market. 

Eligibility is determined with regard to local incomes and local house prices.

Affordable housing should remain at an affordable price for future eligible households.

The Housing and Planning Act 2016 outlines that ‘Starter Homes’ will also be included within an updated affordable housing definition, to be determined by regulations. 

Regulations may include other home ownership schemes, such as rent to buy or starter homes.

Affordable housing cover and include;

Social Rented Housing
Owned by local authorities and Registered Providers, for which guideline target rents are determined through the national rent regime.

Affordable Rented Housing -
Let by local authorities and Registered providers to households who are eligible for Social Rented Housing.

Intermediate Housing - Intermediate Rent
Aimed at people who have difficulty affording market rents and for those who lack a mortgage deposit.

Intermediate Housing - Shared Ownership
A scheme that enables households to buy a share in a property (usually between 25% and 75% of the home’s value). A subsidised rent is payable on the remaining share.

Intermediate Housing - Fixed Equity
Properties are sold at a fixed equity (generally 75%) with no rent payable on the remaining share held by the Registered Provider.

Intermediate Housing - Rent to Buy 
Some homes are available to rent for around 20% less than the market rent values. These have the option to buy shares in the property in the future using the shared ownership model.


Intermediate - Rentplus
A new approach to affordable housing, offering an opportunity to purchase a home through a combination of Affordable Rent and a 10% gifted deposit.

Starter Homes
The Starter Homes initiative is aimed at first time buyers aged between 23 and 40, offering homes for sale with a discount of at least 20% of the property value, capped at £250,000.

For many households looking for a home in South Cambridgeshire, affordability is a huge issue.

House prices are out of reach for many on an average income in the District. Generally a house is considered to be affordable if the house price is of 3 to 3.5 times income.

In South Cambridgeshire, a lower quartile house price to lower quartile income it is currently at 12.4 (June 2016, Housing Market Bulletin).

For those that can’t afford to buy on the open market, an alternative in the private sector is to rent privately.

Private rentals at the lower end of the market are few and far between. Those relying on housing benefit to pay their rent, often have a shortfall of £260 per month, on average (June 2016, Housing Market Bulletin).

Everyone needs a home. If purchasing on the open market or privately renting is unaffordable, the only option available for many is to seek affordable housing. 

There's a huge demand for affordable housing. Over 1,700 people are currently on our affordable housing register. 860 applicants are on the Home Buy Register seeking intermediate housing.

Changes to housing benefit will put pressure on the demand for affordable 1 and 2 bedroom houses.

Our emerging Local Plan states that 40% of the homes on a development site, with an increase of 3 or more homes, are to be affordable. [Policy H/9: Affordable Housing].

We are also very pro-active in bringing forward rural exception sites for affordable housing.

These are developments to meet identified local housing needs on small sites adjoining a development framework boundary. 

Rural Exception sites should provide 100% affordable housing. A small amount of market housing may be permitted to enable the scheme to be developed. 

All affordable homes built on a Rural Exception Site will have a local lettings policy. This is to ensure the homes are offered to local people in the first instance. [Policy H/10: Rural Exception Site Affordable Housing]

A Registered Provider is the name given to all social housing providers (as defined in Section 80 of the Housing and Regeneration Act 2008). 

Homes England, as regulator, maintains a statutory register of all social housing providers.

Most not-for-profit Registered Providers are commonly known as housing associations. Alongside the District Council, provide the majority of affordable homes in the District.

There are currently 28 Registered Providers who own and manage affordable housing in the District, with an estimated 3,200 rented homes and 940 shared ownership homes.

We have retained our housing stock and currently own and manage over 5,200 rented homes and 460 leasehold/equity share homes.

Since 2012 we also have a small new homes development programme. As well as supporting housing associations to bring forward new affordable housing through its enabling role.

We seek to provide a ‘basket of options’ to meet the varying needs of those looking for affordable housing. 

We recognise the need to provide choices to those pushed out of the private market. From those requiring social rented homes to those aspiring to own their own home.

 Affordable housing can be split into two categories:

  • Rented housing – which includes Social Rented and Affordable Rented
  • Intermediate housing – which includes homes for rent and sale provided at a cost above social rent but below market levels.

'Low-cost' home ownership describes a variety of schemes aimed at helping those that cannot afford to buy a home. These fall within the definition of Intermediate housing.

On all new developments that provide an affordable housing contribution, we seek to achieve 70% rented and 30% intermediate. Each scheme is looked at on an individual basis and the tenure mix flexed where viability is an issue or local circumstances dictate a different mix.

The ‘Ladder of Affordability – weekly housing costs’  provides further details on who can afford what in terms of housing.

Social Rented Housing

Social rented housing is owned by local authorities and Registered Providers. The guideline target rents are determined through the national rent regime. 

The rent is calculated using a set formula. This takes into account the value of the property, the average earnings in the area and the number of bedrooms. 

Social Rented properties are the most affordable tenure type. Typically they're around 60% of an open market rent. Housing Benefit is available to qualifying households where they are unable to pay their Social Rent.

The majority of tenancies are offered as fixed-term tenancies or assured tenancies, for no less than five years.

Social Rented properties are allocated through the Sub Regional Choice Based Lettings Scheme. This is known as Home-Link and applicants have to be registered on the Housing Register.

It's unlikely that new developments will include an element of Social Rent but will instead provide Affordable Rented properties. This is due to the changes in funding for affordable housing. 

Social Rented properties therefore only become available when existing Social Rented properties become vacant. 

Registered Providers do also have the ability to convert some of their Social Rented properties to Affordable Rent, as agreed with the Homes & Communities Agency.

Affordable Rented Housing

Affordable Rented housing is let by local authorities or Registered Providers to households who are eligible for Social Rented housing. 

The majority of tenancies are offered as fixed-term tenancies or assured tenancies for no less than 5 years.

Affordable Rent is subject to rent controls that require a rent of no more than 80% of the local market rent (including service charges, where applicable) [Source: NPPF]. 

We aim to keep affordable rents that are within the Local Housing Allowance Rates (LHA). Ensuring households that qualify for housing benefit, have all their rent covered.

Affordable Rented properties are allocated through the Sub Regional Choice Based Lettings Scheme known as Home-Link. Applicants have to be registered on the Housing Register.

Intermediate Housing - Intermediate Rent

An Intermediate Rent aims to help people who have difficulty affording market rents. It also aims to help those who lack a mortgage deposit and so cannot buy a home.

Intermediate Rents are generally set around 80% of the market rate. They  are normally offered on an Assured Shorthold Tenancy with an initial commitment of six months.

The target group for Intermediate Rents is different from those looking for Social/Affordable Rented housing. 

Generally these are targeted at working households, such as those identified as ‘key workers’, such as nurses, teachers, etc.

The allocation of Intermediate Rent is through the Help to Buy Agent.

Intermediate Housing - Shared Ownership

Shared ownership is a scheme that enables households to buy a share in a property (usually between 25% and 75% of the home’s value). A subsidised rent is payable on the remaining share held by the Registered Provider, with the ability to purchase additional shares. 

The combined monthly cost of mortgage and rent will normally be less that if purchasing a property outright.

To be eligible for a shared ownership property, the annual household income can be no more than £80,000. Applicants must be registered on the Home Buy Register.

Intermediate Housing - Fixed Equity

Similar to Shared Ownership, properties are sold at a fixed equity (generally 75%). No rent is payable on the remaining share held by the Registered Provider. 

Further shares in the property cannot be purchased and therefore the home will remain affordable in perpetuity.

This model may be particularly attractive to older people who are equity rich but cash poor. This gives the opportunity for households to downsize to release some of their capital to help pay for living costs/care costs and move into more suitable accommodation.

We will agree with the Registered Provider, the marketing and allocations strategy for these properties.

Intermediate Housing - Rent to Buy

A Registered Provider may offer some homes for rent for around 20% less than the market rent values (similar to an Intermediate Rent). 

The tenant(s) will have the option to purchase shares in the property in the future using the shared ownership model. 

This is aimed at those who do not have a deposit to put down on a property, but would like to buy their own home in the future.

To be eligible, the annual household income can be no more than £80,000 and applicants must be registered on the Home Buy Register.

Intermediate - Rentplus

This is a new approach to offer affordable housing to those who currently do not have the means to buy a property.

It is a hybrid product offering an opportunity to purchase a home through a combination of Affordable Rent and a 10% gifted deposit.

Properties are let to a Registered Provider on a 20 year lease and then rented out. 

Tenants will have 5-year renewable tenancy agreement at an Affordable Rent (capped at LHA rates). They will have the ability to buy the property after 5, 10, 15 or 20 years.

If they decide to purchase, they will receive a 10% gifted deposit of the market value of the property. 

If after 20 years the property can't be purchased, the Registered Provider will try to find alternative accommodation. This will be from their own stock or within the private rented sector.

All Rentplus properties are sold after 20 years. 

If the occupier does not decide to take up the option of buying it, the Registered Provider will have the opportunity to purchase at a 10% discount.

Where this option is not taken up, the property will be put on the open market. With 7.5% of sale proceeds given the local authority to reinvest in affordable housing.

Rentplus is funded by institutional investors or pension funds seeking ethical investment.

We will agree with the Registered Provider, the marketing and allocations strategy for these properties.

To date, the Rentplus product has not been tested in South Cambridgeshire. 

However Rentplus does offer an alternative for those wishing to purchase in the future. This scheme may suit those who are at the start of their careers who cannot afford to buy a home. It's suitable for those that find it difficult to save for a deposit if paying private sector rents.


Starter Homes

The Starter Homes initiative was introduced as part of the new Housing and Planning Act 2016. It's aimed at first-time buyers aged between 23 and 40. This initiative offers homes for sale with a discount of at least 20% of the property value, capped at £250,000.

The Act creates a new duty on all local authority planning departments to promote the supply of Starter Homes in their area. 

It allows the government to set regulations requiring Starter Homes to be included on residential sites as a condition of securing planning permission.

Developments on rural exception sites may be exempt from the Starter Homes requirement.

Although the Housing & Planning Act 2016 includes a new broader definition of affordable housing to include Starter Homes, this cannot be implemented until secondary legislation is passed. 


 

Those that are renting and are unable to meet their rent in full, may be able to claim housing benefit to help.

Housing benefit for private sector rentals is calculated on the Local Housing Allowance (LHA). It's based on bedroom entitlement, rather than the cost of the actual rent. 


LHA rates are set in line with the bottom 30% of average market rents within a Broad Market Rental Area (BRMA). 

South Cambridgeshire is set within three BRMA’s:

  • Cambridge
  • Huntingdon and
  • Stevenage + North Herts

The majority of properties fall within the Cambridge BRMA.  

So, a family with 1 child are entitled to a 2 bedroom allowance. The amount is based on the average rent for the bottom 30% of two bedroom properties in the relevant BRMA.

The Government’s aim is to align housing benefit in the public sector to LHA rates from April 2018. This is for all new tenancies starting from April 2016.

This means capping housing benefit to LHA rates for those living in a council or housing association property. It won't be based on the amount of rent charged by the housing association/local authority.
 

For example, a single person under the age of 35 will only receive benefit up to the shared room rate. Entitlement for couples is a one bedroom room rate. 

The under-occupancy charge, meant that those with one spare bedroom had a 14% reduction in their housing benefit. 25% for two or more spare bedrooms.

It should also be noted that from 7th November 2016, the benefit cap was reduced to £20,000 per year (£13,400 for single people) for those living in South Cambridgeshire. 

The cap limits the amount of benefit people who are able to work could receive whilst not working. 

This does not apply to people aged 65 and over. 

Some of the main benefits included in the cap, comprise child benefit, housing benefit, incapacity benefit, income support and job seekers allowance (although this is not an exhaustive list).

The provision and allocation of rented affordable housing is through Home-Link. Applicants must register on the Housing Register.

The Intermediate housing is generally administered through the Government’s appointed Help to Buy Agent for the East and South East.

Home-Link


Home-Link is the choice based lettings scheme for all council and housing association homes in Cambridgeshire and West Suffolk.

Properties that are available to rent are advertised each week on the Home-Link website and applicants ‘bid’ for properties that they are interested in.

To participate in Home-Link, applicants need to have a local connection to the local authority who they wish to register their application with. 

Allocations are let in accordance with the Council’s Lettings Policy. All applicants will be assessed to determine their eligibility to be placed on the housing register. This ensures homes get let to those in the highest assessed need. It also ensures that we meet the legal obligations as set out in the Housing Act 1996 (as amended).

Once an applicant has been assessed they will be placed in one of the following banding categories. This is dependent on their housing need:

Band A – Urgent Housing Need

Band B – High Housing Need

Band C – Medium Need

Band D – Low Housing Need

Applicants ‘bid’ on properties of their choosing. Applicants are only able to ‘bid’ for properties that they are eligible for, such as relevant property size.

Properties will then be allocated to those who have ‘bid’ and are in the highest banding who have been waiting the longest.

Where properties have a local connection requirement that is village specific (eg. schemes on Rural Exception Sites), priority is given to those applicants who either live, work or have family connections to the village. In these circumstances the banding priority is secondary to local village connection.

Help to Buy East & South East

Help to Buy agents are Registered Providers appointed by the Government’s Homes and Communities Agency (HCA). They support the administration of the majority of the Intermediate products. 

The local Help to Buy Agent for South Cambridgeshire is operated by Bedfordshire Pilgrims Housing Association (BPHA). 

Further details of the various Help to Buy products can be found on the Help to Buy website.

Applicants interested will need to register on the Help to Buy Register.

As well as the Intermediate products listed above that fall into the definition of affordable housing, there are various Government initiatives that can also help households into home ownership. 

Primarily these are supported by the Help to Buy Agents and include equity loans and Help to Buy ISAs.

For more information, visit the Help to Buy website.

Help to Buy - Equity Loans

Through the Equity Loan scheme, the Government will lend up to 20% of the cost of a new home. Only a 5% deposit and a 75% mortgage is required.

No loan fees are charged on the 20% loan for the first 5 years of owning the property. The loan is paid back either at the end of the mortgage term, or when the property is sold.

The scheme is open to both first-time buyers and existing home owners, with no maximum household income to qualify. 

Applicants do not need to be registered with Help to Buy. But they will need to receive ‘Authority to Proceed’ by the Help to Buy Agents. 

Properties are only available under this scheme through participating registered builders.

Help to Buy - ISAs

This scheme offers first-time buyers the opportunity to save into a Help to Buy ISA. The Government will then boost their savings by 25%. 

This means that if £200 is saved, the top up eligible for receipt is £50. The most that each first time buyer (not household) can receive from the Government bonus is £3,000 - two savers from one household could therefore receive up to £6,000.

Each first-time buyer can save up to £200 per month and an initial deposit of up to £1,200 can be put into the ISA in the first month. 

The minimum Government bonus is £400, meaning that the first time buyer would need at least £1,600 before the bonus could be claimed. 

To receive the maximum bonus of £3,000 the first time buyer would need to save £12,000.

Help to Buy ISAs are administered by many high street banks. 

Further details can be found on the Help to Buy website.

The following ladder demonstrates the weekly housing costs for the different housing products in South Cambridgeshire. 

Average earnings (gross) for those on a lower quartile income are £21,000. With those on a median income of £38,500 (as of 2015). 

As a guide, those on a lower average income would be able to afford all housing products above the red line only. Those on average incomes of £38,500 could afford all those above the blue line.

 

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