Deposits and rent

Tenancy deposits and rent in advance

Most private landlords ask for a deposit, usually the same as to one month's rent, before letting a room or a property. 

This money is their security against non-payment of rent, damage to their property or removal of furniture. 

A deposit is returnable and you should get this back when you leave the property. 

However, you will not get back all of your deposit if your landlord has to make deductions.

Your deposit

Your landlord must place your deposit into a Tenancy Deposit Protection Scheme. If they fail to do so, they will lose some of their rights to issue you notice if they wish you to leave.

You can find further information on the Tenancy Deposit Protection Scheme page on the Gov.UK website.


Rent assistance

The council may be able to offer you some assistance with either rent in advance on a loan basis or by using the rent deposit scheme to offer your new landlord a bond in place of a financial deposit being paid at the start of your tenancy.

Wherever you go and however the council can help you it is important to have an income.

If you are unsure about what you can or can’t claim for, please visit the entitledto website.


Tenancy agreement fee

An agent or landlord may also ask for an extra fee for drawing up the tenancy agreement and inventory.

No financial help is available for this, however, they can only charge these fees where they have found accommodation for you. 

It is illegal for an agency to charge for registering with them. If an agency asks for cash before finding a property for you, get advice, as you should not have to pay for information from them or to go on their lists.

 

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